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Posts Tagged ‘laws’

You need to renew your car registration once every year. If you have purchased a new vehicle, the dealer will handle all formalities for the first year. From the second year onwards, you will have to renew your car registration.  Car registration takes place at the Dubai Traffic Department/other emirates traffic department or online and the vehicle testing at Tasjeel Centre Al Barsha, Tasjeel Centre Al Twar, Wasel Belhasa Vehicle Testing Centre in Al Jaddaf and Quick Registration in Al Ghusais (all open 24 hours).

It is worth noting if  a vehicle is not older than three years, it does not need to be tested. It is, therefore, not necessary for the customer to visit the service centre as the whole process can be done online.

Half an hour from start to finish! That’s how long it took me to renew my car registration at the traffic department in Al Barsha this morning. Remarkable when I think back to 15 years ago when I dared not go to get my car registered without our office PRO (Public Relations Officer) to guide me through every step, all the queues and manic hand waving. Read more

The traditional black and white colour that the UAE Nationals wear is not a look of religion, but is about modesty and cultural influences. When an Emirati woman leaves her home, she covers herself with a long black cloak called an “abaya” which is paired with a headscarf called a “sheyla.” A woman should only be seen uncovered by men ineligible  to marry her, and therefore does not need to cover in front of her father, father in law, grandfather, brothers, nephews, sons, grandsons and uncles. Read more

If you’ve ever found yourself lugging a booster seat out of your car and into somebody else’s (or worse – into a plane!) I can almost guarantee that in the process you banged it on various parts of the car and yourself, and perhaps even uttered some language you weren’t entirely proud of. Why are they so enormous? Well, as it turns out, not all of them are…

Enter the Bubblebum. Read more

There’s no doubt that for non-Muslim expats life in Dubai changes during Ramadan, but it’s equally true that this annual observance provides a unique opportunity to immerse oneself in the traditional culture and cuisine of our fair Emirate. Tolerant though it is, Ramadan serves as healthy reminder that Dubai remains a predominantly Muslim city. As such, it is vital to understand the rules of public conduct during the Holy Month. Here are some essential do’s and don’ts to steer you in the right direction. But remember, Muslim or not, all can appreciate the overarching themes this month, that of of tolerance, compassion, gratitude and above all charity. Read more

Each year, thousands of seasoned expats either move house within Dubai or leave the Emirate altogether. One of the downsides of being an expat tenant is that we can often be exploited, especially in the case of having to leave Dubai in a hurry. Some, but not all landlords are unscrupulous and we all know that landlords here in Dubai can be quite unique. So to ensure you get your deposit back here are some helpful tips and advice you can follow. After all, many tenants have had little or no choice but to improve the landlord’s property, at their own expense! Why risk losing your deposit as well? Read more

Being a resident in the UAE means you have a sponsor and if you are a wife you are more than likely sponsored by your husband.

On your visa you will see the words “HOUSEWIFE/NOT ALLOWED TO WORK.”  You are of course allowed to work but only after you obtain a NOC (No Objection Certificate) from your husband stating that he will allow you to work.  When you do eventually find a job the company hiring you has to then apply for a labour card for you – you cannot work for them legally without this.  .

If you are working without a labour card  both you and the company can get fined and you could face imprisonment and/or deportation if caught. Should there be any dispute between you and your employer you will not be able to submit a complaint to the labour courts as you are working illegally. Read more

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